Monday, July 19, 2021

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Chicago's Very Own, Bud Billiken's Day Parade History, Since 1929.


In historical writing and analysis, PRESENTISM is the introduction of present-day ideas and perspectives into depictions or interpretations of the past. I believe presentism is a form of cultural bias, and it creates a distorted understanding of the subject matter. Reading modern notions of morality into the past is committing the error of presentism. I'm well aware that historical accounts are written by people and can be slanted, so I try my hardest to present articles that are fact-based and well researched, without interjecting any of my personal opinions.

NOTE: I present articles without regard to race, color, political party, religion, national origin, citizenship status, gender, age, disability, or military status. What I present are facts — NOT ALTERNATIVE FACTS — about the subject.
 What you won't find are rumors, lies, unfounded claims, character assassinations, hateful statements, insults, or attempts at humor.
PLEASE PRACTICE HISTORICISM, WHICH IS THE
INTERPRETATION OF THE PAST IN ITS OWN CONTEXT.


The Chicago Defender Newspaper was founded by Robert S. Abbot as a weekly periodical for the Chicagoland negro population in 1905.

Bud Billiken day was named by David W. Kellum, editor of the Defender Newspaper, specifically for "The Bud Billiken Children's Club," his page for children. Kellum used the pen name Bud Billiken.
David W. Kellum


David was born in 1903 in Mississippi. In 1917, when David Kellum was 14, a group of white kids attacked him in his hometown in Mississippi. That very night, David’s grandmother put him on a train to Chicago to live with an aunt in the north.

While in high school, David joined the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) and became the first Negro Cadet Major in the program. He married Annie Mae Stewart in 1921. David attended Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism in Evanston, Illinois, Chicago's north suburb. He graduated in 1923. 

Kellum accepted a job at the Chicago Defender newspaper in 1923. He asked the newspaper if he could print a children's column. He explained his idea. He thought that most children would jump at the chance to join a free club for people their own age. Their parent(s) would buy the Defender newspaper for their child, increasing sales.

A "Billiken" was thought to be a Chinese idol of good fortune (aka the Patron Saint of Children); "Bud" is short for "buddy" or "friend." The parade and picnic was Mr. Abbot's idea
as a way to thank the Newsies who sold Chicago Defender newspapers. 
The First Bud Billiken Day Celebration, August 11, 1929.
Kellum devoted much of his energy to educating children about unity. Kellum's fictional character, Bud Billiken, encouraged kids to be honest, listen to their parents, serve their communities, and treat all people with respect. Kellum wrote that Bud’s purpose was “to bring the children of the world closer together and show that all the world is kin.” He said that the club was “the only organization of this kind in the world.”
The 16th annual Bud Billiken Day celebration in Chicago,
on August 11, 1945. In less than a month WWII will
end on September 2, 1945.

By 1930, more than 65,000 kids had joined. The club connected kids with pen pals around the world. When Kellum's son received letters from friends in other countries, He told him, “This is the way it’s supposed to be.”
The Bud Billiken Club and the Chicago Defender newspaper sponsored a parade in 1929 that turned into an annual event for youngsters and their families.
Saturday, August 14, 2021, is Bud Billiken's 92nd Year.

The first mention of "Bud Billiken" in the Chicago Tribune:
"A program dedicated to Americanism has been arranged for the 50,000 Negroes expected to join in the 10th annual picnic sponsored by the Bud Billiken Club, an organization for children, on Saturday, August 10th in Washington Park. The ceremonies, which will be held near the swimming pool at 55th Street, will include patriotic addresses by Mayor Kelly and other civic leaders..."

"Preceding the picnic there will be a parade along South Park Way beginning at 11 o'clock. Led by Joe Lewis, the world's heavyweight boxing champion, the parade will go from 32nd street to 55th street and into the park. Refreshments for the children will be donated by local business leaders of the south-central district."
                                                                    —Chicago Tribune, Sunday, August 4, 1940.

In 1955, David married Kathelynea Ford. Over time, she showed David why she loved the Bahá’í Faith. Kellum joined the congregation in 1963. He started giving public speeches at 'Race Unity Day' events. Kellum held discussion groups at the Baháʼí House of Worship in Wilmette, Illinois. He served as chairman of the Chicago Spiritual Assembly, the governing council for the North Shore's Bahá’í community. 
Baháʼí House of Worship in Wilmette, Illinois, was built as a “gathering place for all humanity” by Canadian architect Louis Bourgeois in 1953.


David W. Kellum, the legendary 'Bud Billiken,' died in Rush-Presbyterian St. Lukes Medical Center in Chicago on Friday, March 20, 1981. He was 78. Kellum died after he developed pneumonia while in the hospital. He was admitted about two weeks earlier after he fractured his leg in a fall. Mr. Kellum is buried at Lincoln Cemetery in Blue Island, Illinois.

Kellum received numerous awards for community service over his lifetime.

The Bud Billiken Parade is still held every August, except in 2020 which was canceled due to COVID-19. It's attended by more than a million people now. 

FAMOUS ATTENDEES AT THE PARADE:
 Politicians: and civic leaders: Both Mayors Daley; the Rev. Jesse Jackson; Senator and as President Barack Obama, President Harry Truman; Chicago Mayor Harold Washington.
U.S. Senator Barack Obama walks with wife Michelle during the Bud Billiken Parade in 2006.
Entertainers: Roy Roger, James Brown, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Aretha Franklin, Lena Horne, Chaka Khan, Spike Lee, L.L. Cool J, Diana Ross, and the Supremes, Oprah Winfrey, Donny Osmond, Queen Latifah, Tyler Perry.
The Bud Billiken Club Hosts Duke Ellington in 1933.
Athletes: Muhammad Ali, Michael Jordan, Joe Louis, former Olympian Jesse Owens and Floyd Patterson.
Former Chicago Alderman Charlie Chew, left, and boxer Muhammad Ali ride in the Bud Billiken Parade in 1975.
The Defender organized a variety of events for the Bud Billiken Club. Kellum was a director and Grand Marshal of the Bud Billiken Parade and Picnic. It grew to become the third-largest parade in the country next to the "Tournament of Roses" on New Years Day and "Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade" in New York City.

Compiled by Dr. Neil Gale, Ph.D. 


Billiken Research. It was so confusing.
Along with the horseshoe, the rabbit's foot, and the four-leaf clover, the Billiken is one of America's favorite good-luck pieces. Those who think it is only an Alaskan souvenir made by Eskimo carvers will be surprised to learn that it originated in Kansas City, Missouri—not Alaska—and that it is still being made in media other than ivory elsewhere in the world.

On October 6, 1908, Florence Pretz, an art teacher and illustrator, was given a seven-year patent for her "design for an image," but the name "Billiken" is not mentioned. Despite numerous inquiries, I have been unable to learn what it means or who named it. Possibly Miss Pretz left the naming up to the principal manufacturers of Billiken objects, The Billiken Company of Chicago, The Craftsman's Guild, and the Billiken Sales Co., all of whom used the date and patent number of Miss Pretz's invention on their objects. 
The Billiken Company of Chicago Token - Carry The Luck In Your Pocket.

I saw my first Billiken in Nome in 1945, but no one could tell me its history or origin ("It's something the Eskimos always made," was a common remark) until 10 years later when my fieldwork in contemporary ivory carving introduced me to Big Mike Kazingnuk, a Little Diomede Island man. Big Mike told me that his brother-in-law, Happy Jack, or Angokwazhuk, the famous ivory carver of Nome's early days, had made the first ivory Billiken in 1909 at the suggestion of a merchant who was called Kopturok ("Big Head") by the Eskimos. 

Happy Jack had copied it from a figurine brought from "the States" that summer. This information clearly established that the Billiken was not a traditional Eskimo object, but there remained the mystery of its origin. A trip to a Seattle antique shop only a few weeks later solved this final problem when I found one of the original figurines, a cast-iron bank. The number 39603 on the back of my discovery led to Miss Pretz's patent and her identity as the creator of the Billiken. 


My interest in the Billiken had begun merely as an inquiry into one of the enduring and staple items of Eskimo ivory repertoire but continued on as a fever of collecting original Billikens and their later-day copies from the United States, Germany, Czechoslovakia, and Japan, and of tracking down all available information, I could about it. As I saw more and more Billikens, it seemed remarkable that so many of the physical characteristics and meanings of the original invention had been retained over such a long time span and in so many media. Thus I set out to compile a history of this unique example of American folk superstition. However, I must confess that I have never been overly fond of the Billiken itself. 

Unlike Rose O'Neil, who designed the related kewpie figurine, Miss Pretz wrote nothing to my knowledge about the Billiken. Still, she obviously had borrowed the shape from an Asian figure, possibly a Buddha or one of the many Taoist gods. However, her illustrations for children's books include pixy-like figures similar to the "Brownies" that were invented by Palmer Cox in 1887, and these brownie-like figures, which floated on oak leaves or nestled on downy tree trunks look very much like her own tour-de-force, the Billiken.
Billiken sketch by Florence Pretz. Miss Florence Pretz sketch by Marguerite Martyn, 1909.


THE ORIGINAL BILLIKENS
When Happy Jack made his first ivory Billiken in 1909, the commercial ones were at the height of their success—having taken the country by storm—but by 1912, they had plunged to oblivion. Original Billikens were made into a variety of forms: bisque dolls, clay incense burners, marshmallow candies, and cardboard jigsaw puzzles and postcards. There were metal banks, hatpins, watch fobs, and belt buckles, and glass bottles, and salt and pepper shakers. A coin-like token had a Billiken in the center with "Grin and Begin to Win" printed around the edge. Young women set plaster-of-paris or alabaster Billikens on their dressers for good luck and said, when things went wrong, "Don't blame me, blame the Billiken." The Billiken was celebrated in the songs "The Billiken Man" and "Uncle Josh Gets A Billiken," and dances with Billiken dolls were performed on stage.

Blanche Ring sings "The Billiken Man" (1909).

"Uncle Josh Gets A Billiken" by Cal Stewart, 1909.

Other similar objects, like the kewpie doll, Gobbo, Silligan ("God of Laughter"), Joss, Billycan, and the subsequent "Billikant," which flooded the market around that time, apparently were inspired by Miss Pretz's Billiken. 

The Kewpie Doll was copyrighted by Rose O'Neil in 1909—a year after Miss Pretz's Billiken—and her kewpie trademark was not taken out until 1913. Miss O'Neil also designed a cheerful figurine that she called Buddha Ho-Ho. 

Gobbo, a cherubic figurine with a tilting head, a huge smile, and fat hands resting on fat knees, was made to be placed on an automobile radiator cap. An advertisement in The Scientific American for May 15, 1909, said, "THIS IS THE MASCOT that has brought good luck to the Maxwell during the entire 10,000 mile non-stop engine run. Attach one to your radiator cap, and you will have no hoodoo." 

Silligan and Billycan apparently were names and objects changed merely enough not to infringe on the original copyright. 

Joss was a seated figurine, skull cap on its head and a pigtail down its back, with hands clasping drawn-up knees. It was patented by the Florentine Alabaster Co. of Chicago the same year as the Billiken, and one writer on dolls thinks that this figurine was the inspiration for the Billiken, but it may have been the other way around. The name, Joss, was merely a pidgin English corruption of the Portuguese word for god and referred to Chinese gods and shrines in general.

Slogans and verses were distributed with the original Billiken to advertise its magical qualities, thereby increasing its sales. These ads and verses suggested that placing faith in this man-made object could easily work wonderful changes in one's life, but its poor record as a manipulator of destiny may have had something to do with its short life outside Alaska. Occasionally it has been suggested that the Billiken performed the same function as the traditional Eskimo amulet, but the "luck" that was supposed to emanate from the possession and manipulation of the Billiken was not at all comparable to the old Eskimo custom of wearing amulets, which were protective devices to keep away bad or undesirable spirits.

Slogans that were associated with the original Billiken were "The God of Things as They Ought to Be" (a reinterpretation of Kipling's L'Envoi: "Shall draw the Thing as he sees It for the God of Things as They Are!"); "Grin and Win"; and just plain "Good Luck."

Some pretty bad verses were printed for distribution with both the original four-inch high, red-headed alabaster figurine and the soft-bodied doll with the Billiken face. The leaflets containing these verses are now very rare, but I found some that had been pasted to old postcards, which, when steamed off, told me considerably more about the advertising schemes for the Billiken.

One of the leaflets has an eight-line poem on one side and an explanation of the miraculous Billiken on the other. This leaflet calls the Billiken "The Good-Luck God" in addition to the "God of Things as They Ought to Be," and its owner is instructed to "Tickle His Toes and See Him Smile." The Billiken was also billed as an amateur psychiatrist, as he was "A Sure Cure for [listed]: The Blues, That Solemn Feeling, The Grouch, The Hoodoo Germ, Hard-Luck Melancholia, The Down-and-Out Bacillus." The recommended "dose" to make life rosy again was "One smile every ten minutes."

Another leaflet, also with a poem on one side, declared in 1908 (when the Billiken had scarcely begun its life) that "the country is ringing with stories of men and women who claim that Billiken has turned the tide for them and opened the way to wonderful strokes of fortune." Furthermore, it gave the comforting information that "He throws a spell over you that has the same effect as mental healing. You feel that you can do anything—and back of all achievement lies confidence. That is why Billiken brings luck." It further added that "Billiken is not sold. That would break his spell. He is loaned to you for 100 years for a hundred cents, paid in advance."

The verses held promise of great expectations. One exploited a "happy" theme, and another, a "lucky" theme. The two verses were also used together as one poem:

I am the God of Happiness,
I simply make you smile,
I prove that life's worth living
And that everything's worth while;
I force the failure to his feet
And make the growler grin,
I am the God of Happiness,
My name is Billiken.

I am the God of Luckiness,
Observe my twinkling eye—
Success is sure to follow those
Who keep me closely by;
I make men fat and healthy
Who were quarrelsome and thin;
I am the God of Luckiness,
My name is Billiken.

One of the verses printed on the doll's box also contained the familiar lucky theme, embodied, however, in even more forgettable poetry:

I'm Billiken whose lucky grin
Makes gloom run out and joy run in
I'm fond of little boys and girls
I love to nestle 'gainst their curls
And so that it could be arranged
Into a doll myself I've changed.

The Billiken doll has the earliest known patent on a complete doll (July 22, 1909) with a "Can't Break 'Em" head of a substance invented by Solomon Hoffman and used on numerous dolls at that time.

Postcards were printed with drawings of the Billiken and with one or more of the various slogans or verses. A favorite couplet that was also used beneath the picture of a Billiken on the box cover for a Billiken jigsaw puzzle was:

As long as I smile at you
bad luck can't harm you.

The Gobbo radiator cap was also advertised with information written in the form of a poem:

The smiling god of good fortune,
The original divinity of optimism,
Whose cheerful countenance
Brings good luck
And happy days to all who
Observe this rule of life:
"BE CHEERFUL AND YOU WILL BE RICH IN EVERYTHING."

IVORY BILLIKENS
Early 20th Century
carved Ivory Billiken
from Alaska.
The first Billikens in ivory were made to carry in the pocket or display on a table, but they were later made into a great variety as the original Billikens. I have seen Billiken gavels, salt, and pepper shakers, paper knives, pipes, cigar and cigarette holders, keyrings, cocktail picks, handles for bottle openers, lariat ties, pendants, cuff links, earrings, zipper pulls, pickle forks, tie tacks, pawns in an ivory chess set, and links in necklaces, bracelets, and watch bands. They have also been made in bas relief on several objects like cribbage boards and napkin rings. 

During World War II, men stationed at Marks Field across the Snake River from Nome often commissioned carvers to carry out their ideas about souvenirs, among which were the Milliken (a female Billiken) and the "Billiken in a barrel." The latter had a movable penis that popped out above the top of the barrel when the Billiken, which was fastened to the barrel with a lacework of rubber bands, was raised. 

The diagnostic features of the original Billiken have endured in ivory to this day: the grinning mouth, peaked hair, large eyes, jaunty eyebrows, hands plastered to the sides of the body, and feet stuck straight out in front. However, since Eskimos were unable to make the Billikens in molds like the original ones and had to carve within the limitations of walrus tusk ivory-and often in a hurry, they devised stylized gashes or dots for the fingers, toes, nostrils, eyebrows, mouth, nipples, and navel. These features were often colored with India ink. The head was pointed to represent the original peaked hair. These characteristics were retained for many years, no matter whether the Billiken was big or tiny, fat or thin until commercial carvers in Seattle began to make Billikens from sperm whale teeth to send back to Alaska for sale. The pointed bent shape of the sperm whale tooth dictated a willowy creature without ears and with an elongated and peaked head. This style has recently been adopted by a few Alaskan carvers in walrus ivory. Another new and quite different interpretation of an ivory Billiken has extremely large ears and pronounced legs in a sitting position, almost like the old Joss figurine. Other variations are constantly tried—like the Milliken-Billiken back to back and a Billiken with a bright red Tam-O-Shanter—but few succeed. The carver finds that it is easier to carve the old-style Billiken, which the tourists prefer anyway. The Canadian Eskimo's success in soapstone sculpture after 1945 spurred carvers both in Alaska and Seattle to make Billikens in stone. 

Many of the old beliefs surrounding the Billiken have continued to this day, although the popular Alaskan superstition of rubbing the Billiken's stomach while making a wish was not devised by the early writers of Billiken slogans and verses but was probably borrowed later from the beliefs of Oriental Buddha-like figurines that were made as gift and souvenir items, also to bring good luck and happiness. The most common is the hotei (or hoti) figurine, made as statues or jewelry. Hotei is a standing figure with a huge drooping stomach; its arms are upraised, and it appears to be laughing uproariously. Advertisements for the hotei say that a person will have good fortune all day long if his belly is rubbed. 

Popular good-luck pieces in Hawaiian gift shops are similar gods of "happiness" and "good luck." They are quite unlike the Billiken in appearance, but the ideas connected with them are strikingly similar to those of the Billiken today. Made of lava, the two most common are Hauoli Akua (Happy God) and Akaaka, also a "happy god." Directions that accompany both of them say that happiness comes by rubbing the tummy. 

A popular belief in Nome during the 1940s and 1950s was a reinterpretation of the original "loan" of the Billiken for a hundred cents: an owner of a Billiken will have small luck if he purchased one himself, but considerably more luck if he received one as a gift. However, if a person wanted superlative luck, a Billiken had to be stolen. (At last report, I heard that this procedure had gone out of vogue.) 

Alaskan storekeepers have devised many verses over the years for brochures to accompany the ivory Billiken. A verse in the 1950 catalog brochure of a Nome curio shop said: 

Rub his tummy or tickle his toes,
You'll have good luck so the story goes.

The same catalog featured an erroneous story that the Billiken had been copied after a big wooden Billiken on Big Diomede Island. This publicity helped considerably to spread the false information that the Billiken had been a traditional Eskimo object. The wooden statue referred to actually existed but was a large driftwood stump carved into a face, which was fed a small amount of food whenever a person passed it so that its spirit would continue to provide good hunting.

FURTHER BORROWING OF THE BILLIKEN
The Alaskan Eskimo carver was not the only one to borrow the idea of the original Billiken. At the height of its popularity, it was also used as an emblem, trademark, and name by various enterprises, organizations, and publications. One of its earliest uses was as the patron saint for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle in 1909. 

In 1910 or 1911, the name became attached to the St. Louis University athletic teams when a fan put a picture of a Billiken in a campus hangout near the athletic field. Seeing a resemblance to the popular athletic director, John Bender, the public began calling the teams "Bender's Billikens. 

In 1910, an Ohio man named William I. Kin published a philatelic magazine, Billikens, the spelling with the ending -in resulting from the coincidence of his own name. This misspelling was deliberate, but others like "Chuck's Billiken Gift shop" in Nome in the 1960s; The Billiken '49er, the official publication of the Billiken Chapter of the National Secretaries Association (Anchorage); and The Billiken Courier, an espionage novel of 1958 by T. C. Lewellen are unintentional misspellings. 

In 1911, "The Royal Order of Jesters" was founded by a group of Shriners en route to a convention in Honolulu. They adopted the Billiken as their symbol and the phrase "Mirth is King" as their slogan. A Shriner must contribute many years' work to their philanthropic programs to be invited into the Membership of the Jesters. By the 1960s, the origin of their emblem had been forgotten, and one of its members, becoming curious, asked many members and wrote to numerous museums without finding information. Finally, he discovered my article in the Alaska Sportsman (September 1960) and read the section about the figurine in my book Artists of the Tundra and the Sea. In 1968, he bound copies of his correspondence and information about the Billiken into a report, which he presented to the Aloha Court in Honolulu for distribution to other courts. 

The Jesters recently copyrighted the Billiken, which members can purchase as gold-plated jewelry and statuettes, often with a crown on its head (i.e., "Mirth is King") and green glass eyes and a red glass navel.  

After a period of obscurity on the commercial market, the Billiken gradually reappeared, and many of the revivals—especially the hideous ceramic statuettes, banks, and salt and pepper shakers made in Japan—were probably copied after the Alaskan ivory Billiken. Many amateur sculptors have also tried their hand at making Billikens in wood, clay, soap, and ivory, and commercial companies in Japan, Europe, and the United States are continuing the output in a variety of forms. Some of the recent ones illustrated in this article: beads, apparently made in Czechoslovakia just before World War II; the Billiken-billikant figurines, which are very free interpretations of the originals; the concrete Billiken bought in Richmond, Virginia in 1970; the tin mold, in Chicago in 1972; and the two sterling silver charms, purchased at the Seattle-Tacoma Airport in 1964 and 1973. I also have a gold-colored metal bank, which had been copied from the original by a Paris, Illinois, firm in 1973. 

In 1920, a literary magazine, Billiken; revista illustrada, began publication in Caracas, Venezuela, with Lucas Manzano as editor, and continued until about 1946. Many whimsical Billikens with arms and legs were drawn throughout the magazine in each issue. 

In 1929, "Bud Billiken" became the "mythical saint" or godfather of black children when the Billiken Club for Chicago Children was founded. A parade and a picnic have been an annual event in August ever since. In 1968, 40 floats, 12 brass bands, eight drum and bugle corps, and 100 cars participated in the parade sponsored by the Chicago Defender Charities. A feature of the parade was marching on the newly-named Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive. 

Over the years, other institutions and organizations have adopted the Billiken name, such as the Billiken Lounge (Fairbanks), Billiken Ski Club (Seattle), and Billiken Theater (Anchorage). There are even children's shoes called Billikens. 

Probably the greatest heights to which a Billiken has soared was the top man on a totem pole illustrated on the cover of a Bureau of Indian Affairs pamphlet, "Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts of Alaska" (1966). This combination of figures on a totem pole had also been reported in the April 1959 issue of the Alaska Sportsman as having been carved by one of its readers in New Hampshire. It is understandable why a nostalgic Alaskan might carve such a pole, but what right does a Missouri Billiken have to be on a Tlingit Indian totem pole in a booklet that is supposed to contain authentic information about Alaskan Natives? 

But this is scarcely less bizarre than the place of the Billiken in the folklore of the Chukchi people of Siberia. In 1953, V. V. Antropova illustrated three ivory Billikens in her monograph, "Survey of Chukchi and Eskimo Carving," and in 1964, E. P. Orlova, four more in her book, Chukchi, Koryak, Eskimo, and Aleut Bone Carving. Called "pelikens" in Russian, these Billikens look exactly like the Alaskan-carved ones, and well they might, because this figurine was introduced to the Eskimos of Uelen, Siberia, less than 40 miles from Little Diomede Island, by Alaskan Eskimos shortly after 1909. But I had not realized how firmly the Billiken had become a part of the cosmic beliefs and carving repertoire of the Siberians until I read a short story, "The Sea Lion" by Yuri Rythkeu a Chukchi writer born in Chukotka.

The story concerns a young Chukchi girl, Emul, who, though offered a scholarship to a teachers college in Anadyr, had remained at home among her people, working as a waitress. Her father had been chairman of the local soviet, and her mother was head of a commission organized to abolish their old ways, but after World War II, her father lost his job, and the people resisted the new ways and had returned to their old way of living. 

When her grandfather died, Emul finished carving a number of ivory "idols" (Billikens), which had already been paid for. This figurine, it is explained, was a very popular souvenir: a "fat little god with screwed-up eyes [that] stood on shelves and desks and . . . even clipped to the ears of fashionable women." And, according to Chukchi mythology, this figurine originally had been used by every hunter who hung it on his hunting gear "so that everything bad in him would pass into the idol." That was quite a responsibility for a Billiken from Missouri. 

One day a young archeologist asked Emul to make him a dozen "idols" to take back to Leningrad. "It will be something to remind me of Chukotka and you," he said, " . . . carve me something that will make me want to come back again." 

But his words and something inside Emul prevented her from making the idol. Instead, she carved a sea lion—a rarity in that part of the country, but which she had once seen—with her whole mind and heart. When finished, it was a work of art like a walrus tusk engraved with beautiful scenes, which she had once found buried in her grandfather's toolbox, quite unlike the boring, monotonous "idols." 

The young man was sorely disappointed when he got the sea lion instead of the Billikens and asked Emul, "How will I be able to show my face in Leningrad without any?" Emul fled out to the tundra and to the cliffs of the sea as the ship prepared to take the young man and the sea lion away, but after her tears of bitterness had dried, she discovered that the gift of seeing things in their true perspective had been restored to her, and so she went home, renewed. 

This story, too, puts the Billiken in its proper Alaskan perspective because of all objects made by the Eskimo carver. Few present less of a challenge to make, except possibly how best to use small bits of ivory. Despite the contemporary carver's reluctance to try innovations—mainly because of economic reasons—carving the Billiken is regarded only as a necessity to make ends meet. The Billiken is really a caricature of the carver himself, but to the tourist, few souvenirs so readily connote "Alaska" even though it is a cartoon.

Published in The Alaska Journal, Winter 1974. 
Edited by Dr. Neil Gale, Ph.D.

Saturday, July 17, 2021

The Halsted Cable Car Line in 1893. Chicago City Railroad Company.

Chicago City Railroad Company's cable cars began service on February 23, 1882. The Halsted Cable Car (№ 5871) line passes through a subway on Twelfth Street (Roosevelt Road) for half a mile before reaching the Halsted Street terminal at a speed of ten miles per hour. At its height, Chicago’s cable car system had 13 power plants. Chicago’s last cable car made its final run in 1906.



SOUTH HALSTED STREET LINE IN 1893 — THE DOWNTOWN LOOP ROUTE 
  • Franklin Street, from tunnel south (about 110 feet) to Van Buren Street (single track).
  • Van Buren Street, from Franklin Street to Dearborn Street (single track).
  • Dearborn Street, from Van Buren Street to Adams Street (single track).
  • Adams Street, from Dearborn Street to Franklin Street (single track).
  • Franklin Street, from Adams Street to tunnel (single track).
  • Tunnel, from Franklin Street to Clinton Street.
  • Clinton Street, from the tunnel to Van Buren Street.
  • Van Buren Street, from Clinton Street to Halsted Street.
  • Halsted Street, from Van Buren Street to O’Neil Street (23rd Street).
  • O’Neil Street (23rd Street), from Halsted Street into car barns at the southwest corner.
NOTE: On June 6, 1892, the first elevated — or 'L' — train ran from 39th (Pershing Road today) and State Streets to Congress Parkway and Wabash Avenue. By 1893, the Chicago and South Side Rapid Transit Railroad extended the elevated line to Jackson Park, the site of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition.

Compiled by Dr. Neil Gale, Ph.D.

Wednesday, July 14, 2021

The Camellia House Restaurant in The Drake Hotel, Chicago. (1940-1977) including the Original Camellia House Salad Dressing Recipe.



The Internationally famous Camellia House restaurant of Chicago's distinguished lakeside Drake Hotel. Traditionally one of the city's finest Supper Clubs. It featured superb cuisine and service in accompaniment to dancing, songs, and entertainment by artists from Europe to the Orient.  
Syracuse China dinnerware was designed by Dorothy Draper for the Camellia House restaurant in Chicago's Drake Hotel. First produced in 1940, this beautiful pattern was made with different colors accents (the ring on this plate). Postcards of the Camellia House from the 1960s show this pattern on tables. The Drake Hotel retired these in the late 1960s.


In the 1940s and 50s, the restaurant hosted an in-restaurant live radio show (on AM radio, of course) with music and a talk show. It was THE place to host weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvah parties, baby showers, sweet-16 birthdays, and gatherings of all types. The stage was beautiful and the dancefloor was hoppin'.


I personally dined there many times in the late 1960s and early '70s. It was my Mom's favorite restaurant. Although it was excessively pricy, the food and service were 5-star and worth every penny. The Drake Hotel's famous seafood restaurant, the "Cape Cod Room," closed in 2016.



By Dr. Neil Gale, Ph.D.


The Original Camellia House, Salad Dressing Recipe:
  • 3 medium whole eggs
  • 1½ - 2 Tbsp. Coleman's dry mustard powder
  • 1 dash (< 1/8 tsp) ground white pepper
  • 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • ½ tsp. Louisiana-style hot sauce
  • 2 oz. hot water
  • 1 qt. corn oil
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
Mix all ingredients in a bowl until well combined (or use a processor to mix).
Store tightly covered at room temperature.

Monday, July 12, 2021

Another Example of Lincoln's Kindness.

My first strong impression of Mr. Lincoln," says a lady of Springfield, "was made by one of his kind deeds. I was going for my first trip alone on the railroad cars. It was an epoch [event] of my life. 

I had planned for it and dreamed of it for weeks. The day I was to go came, but as the hour of the train approached, the hackman (a carriage driver), through some neglect, failed to call for my trunk. As the minutes went on, I realized, in a panic of grief, that I should miss the train. I was standing by the gate, my hat and gloves on, sobbing as if my heart would break when Mr. Lincoln came by. 

"Why, what's the matter?" he asked me, and I poured out all my story.

"How big's the trunk? There's still time if it isn't too big." And he pushed through the gate and up to the door. I took him up to my room, where my old-fashioned trunk stood, locked and tied. "Oh, no," he cried, "wipe your eyes and come on quick." And before I knew what he was going to do, he had shouldered the trunk, was downstairs, and striding out of the yard. Down the street he went, fast as his long legs could carry him, I trotting behind, drying my tears as I went. We reached the station in time. Mr. Lincoln put me on the train, kissed me goodbye [on the forehead], and told me to have a good time. It was just like him.

Saturday, July 10, 2021

A Short History of the Chicago Motor Coach Company's Double-Decker Buses, and John Hertz, Owner.

The Chicago Motor Coach Company was founded in 1917 by John Daniel Hertz, Sr. [1] providing Chicago's first bus transportation services, primarily in places where streetcars could not travel.

At 1 pm. on March 25, 1917, a Chicago Motor Coach Company double-decker bus full of Chicago's elite, including Mayor William "Big Bill" Thompson and Illinois Governor Edward Dunne, embarked on the North Side's very first public bus ride from Devon Avenue and Sheridan Road in the Edgewater community, all the way downtown

On the return trip, the group stopped at the Edgewater Beach Hotel for a celebration luncheon.
A Chicago Motor Coach Company bus driving down Sheridan Road past the Edgewater Beach Hotel. 




Initially, 11 buses were launched, with another 39 rolled out over the following month. 

The buses ran from 6 o’clock in the morning until 1:30 at night. Buses were scheduled to run 3-6 minutes apart and had the capacity to carry 51 patrons — 22 on the bottom and 29 on the top. The vehicles had a step-less entrance and an enclosed stairway to the upper level.
A New Motor Coach at Edgewater Beach Hotel with the Devon Avenue Destination Marquee. c.1919


The coaches were staffed by both a driver and chauffeur. While the driver steered the vehicle, the chauffeur stood in a small enclave on the bus's exterior and helped passengers get on and off.

From the border of Rogers Park and Edgewater, the motor company said the first trip took 40 minutes to get downtown for 10¢. This route was shortened to twenty-five to thirty minutes. Express and local buses were a part of the system. Customers could catch a ride by simply hailing the bus at any intersection along its route. It is proposed to shorten this schedule to twenty-five to thirty minutes. Express and local buses were part of the system.
Chicago Motor Coaches in the Loop, 1922.


The bus system route ran south on Sheridan from Devon, down through various parts of Lincoln Park before winding through the Loop onto Michigan Avenue, Ontario, La Salle, Randolph, and Adams streets, stopping at a final State Street terminal and then turning around.

So few seats were provided by the bus company during the morning rush hour that it had been observed that private motorists had taken pity on intended bus passengers and stopped on Sheridan Road to offer to give them a lift.


In the early 1920s, two other city transit branches — the Chicago Stage Company and the Depot Motor Bus Lines — merged with the Chicago Motor Coach Company, adding their South Side routes and busses to Chicago Motor Coach Company. By this time, the Chicago Motor Coach Company operated with 423 buses and 1,800 employees serving 134 miles of Chicago streets.
Map showing south side streets and boulevards over which the Chicago Motor Bus Company has received operating rights from the South Park Board and the Illinois Commerce Commission.



Hertz, president of Yellow Cab Company, bought the bus entity in 1924 and merged it with New York's Fifth Avenue Motor Coach Corporation to create The Omnibus Corporation. He sold a majority interest in the Yellow Truck and Coach Manufacturing Company to General Motors in 1925 and then the balance in 1943.






Chicago Motor Coach - № 706 in service at the Chicago 1933 World's Fair.
A June 1935 sketch to show some of the selling points of the model 720. 
The first model 720 fitted with a second door, seen in June 1935. Everyone seems to be having fun modeling how passenger flow is meant to work. The chap leaning out of the upstairs window is really enjoying himself. 
The cramped driver’s compartment and staircase layout. It looks a bit of a squeeze to get onto the stairs but at least the driver has a rather comfy seat.
The lower deck of the same bus, looking forwards. The effect of the lowered window line is clear.
The upper deck of the model 735, seen in March 1938. Note the pronounced dome of the ceiling and the comfortable-looking seats.
Chicago Motor Coach Company - 72 Passenger Double Decker Coach, 1936.
















Chicago Transit Authority is an independent governmental agency created by state legislation. CTA began operating on October 1, 1947, after it acquired the properties of the Chicago Rapid Transit Company and the Chicago Surface Lines. On October 1, 1952, CTA became the predominant operator of Chicago transit when it purchased the Chicago Motor Coach system.



From its early years, the Chicago Motor Coach fleet consisted of double-decker buses that provided additional capacity, as well as great views from the upper level. Unfortunately, its earliest double-deckers also had their drawbacks, since the upper level was not completely enclosed or heated. The roof extended only over each row of seats and was open in the middle, which provided little protection from the elements. In addition, as time went on, there were various clearance issues that posed potential hazards to the passengers — some riders recalled passengers having to duck down when the double-deckers went under some of the railroad viaducts — so these buses were phased out, with the last double-decker being retired in 1950.

Compiled by Dr. Neil Gale, Ph.D.


[1] John Daniel Hertz, Sr. (1879-1961) founded the Chicago Motor Coach Company in 1917 to run bus transport services in Chicago. During the period that he was running this company, he was actively involved with many other transport businesses, including taxicab operation, taxicab manufacture, car rental, and manufactured coaches and later cars. Hertz formed the Yellow Coach Manufacturing Company in 1923 as a subsidiary of the Yellow Cab Company to manufacture buses, many of which were used by the Chicago Motor Coach Company. 

Hertz formed the Omnibus Corporate in 1924 as a merger of the Chicago Motor Coach and the Fifth Avenue Motor Coach Corporation of New York City. Between 1925 and 1936, The Omnibus Corporation acquired streetcar companies that operated on Madison Avenue and Eighth Avenue in New York City's borough of Manhattan.

Hertz sold a majority interest in the Yellow Coach Manufacturing Company to General Motors in 1925 and then the balance in 1943.

In 1952, the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) purchased the Chicago Motor Coach Company.

In 1953, Hertz made a deal for The Omnibus Corporation to purchase the 'Hertz Drive-Ur-Self System' car rental business from GM that he had sold to GM as part of the Yellow Truck and Coach Manufacturing Company in 1925. Hertz sold all The Omnibus Corporation's public transport interests the same year, changed the name to 'The Hertz Corporation,' and floated it (refers to the regular shares a company has issued to the public that are available for investors to trade) on the New York Stock Exchange the following year. 

Thursday, July 8, 2021

The History of the Town and Country Restaurants in Chicago. (1955-1987)

Tony Smith began his restaurant career with a fortune of $900 ($10,000 today), with a friend as a partner, opening the Kopper Kettle restaurant at Randolph and Dearborn Streets in 1950.

Brothers and co-owners, Anthony 'Tony' J. Smith and Ted Smith, traveled to research other restaurants in America and Europe with the development of this restaurant in mind.\

Town and Country restaurant opened in September 1955 at 5970 North Ridge Avenue, at Peterson Avenue, and Clark Street in Chicago. 






A sign hung in the Town and Country restaurant that read: "EVERY DAY IS THE ONLY DAY OF ITS KIND."

The Town and Country restaurant was the winner of the 'Award of Food Service' in May 1956 in a contest judged by over 50 famous professionals in restaurant design, kitchen engineers, and foodservice consultants, sponsored yearly by the Institutions Magazine. The Town and Country restaurant was the first Chicago restaurant to win this International award in five years. Entries comprised food service establishments from all over the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

Tony Smith was voted the president of the Chicago Restaurant Association in 1956 and 1957. 

In May 1957, Tony Smith, co-owner, took two months off to tour European continental cafes.

One of the Smith brothers' favorite stories to tell was when a customer ordered cold vichyssoise and, because a waitress goofed, found himself eating a bowl of garlic salad dressing.

When Tony or Ted traveled, many regular patrons of Town & Country would send favorite recipes of faraway places. The Smiths would turn the recipes over to their head chef to try some of the dishes on willing customers.
Ted Smith owned a delightful Courtesy Car similar to this 1931 Chevrolet AE Independence, V8 355 HP 4-Speed Automatic with A/C, complete with a gold velvet interior, pull-down shades at the windows, and running boards. It was quite the conversation starter.





On Monday, December 10, 1956, twenty-five boys and girls from the Angle Guardian orphanage at 2001 West Devon Avenue in Chicago competed in a Christmas tree trimming contest in the Town and Country restaurant at 5970 North Ridge Avenue, Chicago. After the contest, the 25 youngsters and 650 other boys and girls from the orphanage were treated to a cake and ice cream social.





Tony Smith                           Ted Smith
Town and Country grossed more than $1 million a year ($8,915,000 today) for 1957.

The brothers, Tony and Ted, ever inventive, offered a Christmas shopping service in 1961 while people dine. They keep stacks of recent newspapers to provide patrons free ads for clipping, so diners may complete shopping lists at their tables.

The brothers had taken to operating the "Royal Hearth" and the "Imperial Grill," with a partner, Jim Docos, in the new Imperial Inn behind the Congress expressway just west of the river in 1962.
Chicago Tribune, December 8, 1962





The Town and Country restaurant on Ridge Avenue came to the unfortunate aid in June 1962. Its marquee reads: "have an ulcer? Bring your baby food. We'll warm it for you."

Since 1963 the Cafe Chablis (Sha-Blee) at 6510 West North Avenue between Austin and Harlem was owned and operated by one of Chicagoland's better-known restauranteurs, Ted Smith, who incidentally owns Town and Country restaurant on Ridge Avenue.
Chicago Tribune, April 2, 1967




 
THE TOWN AND COUNTRY XPRESSWAY RESTAURANT
A new Town and Country Xpressway restaurant opened on February 6, 1968, at 1500 West North Avenue at the Kennedy Expressway (I94) just east of Ashland Avenue, "Serving Chicagoland on Wheels."
Chicago Tribune, February 4, 1968




An award-winning impressionistic painting of the forty-foot fireplace by artist Otto Schoeniger was prominently displayed at the new Town and Country Xpressway restaurant. Colorful lithographs of the canvas were presented to dinner guests during the Grand Opening Celebration on Tuesday, February 6, 1968.





This was an exciting new restaurant that offers round-the-clock 24-hour food service. It's convenient, the service was excellent, the food great. Situated "midtown" at the gateway to the suburbs, Town and Country Xpressway leis six minutes from downtown Chicago and within minutes of many north, west, and south suburbs. Stop in any hour ... you'll find a complete breakfast menu, business men's lunch, complete dinners, and late-night snacks.
Exterior view of the new and beautiful Town and Country Xpressway restaurant, serving you 24 hours a day.

The exterior of this handsome restaurant was reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright's imaginative designs, with attractive common brick in contemporary styling. Lush plantings and sweeping picture windows add to the overall beauty.  And once you've entered the foyer, you'll be impressed with the same decor. 

With its breath-taking wigwam type high ceiling roof design, the dining room, with a gas-burning fireplace in the center, was the focal point of interest. The main dining room decor was a subtle blend of beige, gold, and orange. Leather booths line the walls, fresh flowers are always on the tables ... and the fabulous 40-foot brick chimney that reaches up to a skylight in the center of the room was an attention-getter.
The dramatic brick chimney in the dining room at Town and Country sweeps up to the unusual wigwam ceiling.




This new Town and Country restaurant was geared for Kennedy expressway travelers.
The back cover of the new 1968 menu.



QUICKIE COFFEE SHOP
Open 24 hours a day, the Town and Country Coffee Shop was an attractive spot any time of the day or night. Here you can get fast service and fine food. There are island counters and comfortable booths for dining. The decor was orange, with Chicago common brick walls.
https://drloihjournal.blogspot.com/2016/12/chicago-common-brick-and-street-paver.html

UNUSUAL TOUCHES
Ted Smith has put a lot of thought into the decor of this restaurant. Beautiful original oil paintings adorn the walls. There are some interesting and unusual antique lighting fixtures. The foyer boasts a huge square clock that originally hung in a French railroad station, and the dining room has a replica of an old railroad train on the wall.

BEHIND THE SCENES
A restaurant tour finds immaculate kitchens and the bakery shop, where all the loaves of bread and desserts are prepared. Emanating from here, you'll find hot Challah [bread], long loaves of French sourdough bread, homemade ice creams, cookies, cakes, coffee cakes, and fruit pies. The walk-in coolers are filled with choice meats, all butchered and cut in-house. There are cold lockers for salads, seafood, vegetables, and it's immaculately clean!

SPECIALITIES OF THE HOUSE
Most distinguished restaurants feature specialties of the house, and Town and Country have been acclaimed for their outstanding specials. You'll enjoy Town and Country's Swiss Steak Stew in a Bread Basket, bite-size pieces of swiss steak with gravy in a hollowed-out mini loaf of our freshly baked bread, garnished with cherry tomatoes, a bowl of gravy, and a salad. For late evenings you'll enjoy Crepes filled with grape jelly and topped with orange and lemon rind slivers in a Grand Marnier sauce. 

Forget about calories and try the Town and Country famous Baked Alaska ice cream pie with your choice of hot fudge, strawberry, hot honey rum, caramel, or brandied cherry topping. We make ice cream in-house. Besides our Baked Alaska, other best-selling desserts included German chocolate cake and our Chocolate rum whipped cream cake. These are but a few of the many outstanding house specials offered.

OPEN 24 HOURS
Breakfasts at Town and Country were reasonably priced, and there's a wide selection. For as little as $1.20, you can get an egg, sausage or bacon, hash brown potatoes, juice, and a beverage. The breakfast menu was large and included such favorites as Eggs Benedict, Shirred eggs, French Toast, pancakes, and cereals. Brunch was served on Sundays from 10 am to 1:30 pm. 

The menu changes daily. You'll find in addition to the regular menu at least five entrees, and they included juice or seasonal fresh fruit, Danish coffee cake, sweet roll (about 8 or 9 inches), buttered toast, or English muffin (served with egg orders), and a beverage.

Lunches are served, and here again, the menu changes daily. You'll find crisp salads, hot and cold sandwiches, and our famous Xpressway Burgers.

Diners at Town and Country were served every night in the dining room until 12 midnight. On weekends until 2 am. The dinner menu features such favorites as Roast Sirloin of Beef au jus with Yorkshire pudding, Beefeaters Broil, a tasty sirloin butt steak with French fried onion rings, broiled York sirloin steak, freshly broiled Whitefish with amandine butter, pepper steak, pan-fried chicken, and many others. Every entree was cooked to order. Complete dinners included soup or appetizer, salad, potato and vegetable, beverage, and dessert. Prices start as low as $2.95. Children's portions under 10 years old, 50¢ less.

NIGHT OWL SUGGESTIONS
If you're on your way home from the theater or a night on the town, stop in for a night owl snack. Prices were moderate and the food divine. A favorite late-night dish was the French onion soup fondue served with a melted cheese cap. Our bar serves excellent giant-size cocktails, domestic and imported beers, and wines if you want a nightcap.

CARRY OUT SPECIALS
In the foyer at Town and Country was a retail counter that featured our baked on-premises; cookies, cakes, coffee cakes, pies, candies, eclairs, and many other sweet delicacies. Even their famous baked Alaska ice cream pie was available to take home.

Town and Country had a great slogan; 'SPA' service, price, and atmosphere. The atmosphere was unusually charming, the prices right, and the service most excellent.

An exhibit of photographs of Lake Michigan yachts by Dr. Grant H. Johnson will be on display from May 24, 1970, thru June 1st in the Town and Country restaurant on Ridge Avenue.

AT TOWN AND COUNTRY
Dinners are willing to give up cake and caviar during these days of advancing prices, but not steak and lobster. At least this is the conclusion to Ted Smith, proprietor of Town and Country restaurants at 5970 N Ridge Avenue and 1500 West North Avenue in Chicago. 

Following the format of many restaurants to defeat rising costs, Mr. Smith changed table d'hote dinners last month at his Town and Country Xpressway on West North Avenue to semi-a la carte. He eliminated appetizer and dessert from the former complete fixed price dinner and now offers the main course at a lower cost than on the complete dinner, including salad, sourdough bread, a vegetable, and a beverage.

Instead of cost-conscious customers turning to the least expensive entrees or main dishes, he finds patrons ordering more lobster tails [at $4.95 semi-a la carte] and sirloin butt steak [at $4.45 semi-a la carte] than ever.

However, table d'hote dinners still prevail at the Town and Country on Ridge Avenue, which celebrated its 15th anniversary this month. During the birthday month, Mr. Smith offers guests in both restaurants a glass of champagne with dinner and a bakery gift to take home.
                                                                                         —Chicago Tribune, October 16, 1970

The "Action Express" column in the Chicago Tribune of October 27, 1970, has a Q & A about Town and Country on Ridge Avenue.
Q —I recently took relatives to the Town and Country on Ridge Avenue and I ordered one of those combination fruit salads. All I was served was one scoop of cottage cheese and a few pieces of fruit. For this, I was charged $2.85! I didn't want to embarrass the kinfolk; so I didn't growl at the manager until later. He said I should have groped immediately. I then complained to the restaurant owner, and he merely invited me to return and see what a fruit plate looks like. He simply told me I could look at a fruit plate. How ridiculous it would be for me to spend bus fare to see what I should have been served but wasn't. Shouldn't the public know about this kind of outrageous fleecing?
                                                                                                                 —Vera, Chicago

A —David Wright, the restaurant's general manager, took your problem to three dining room employees. They told him you had asked that certain food be deleted from the "award-winning fruit plate" and that others be substituted. The employee told Wright your special order was filled, even tho the restaurant has a "no substitutes policy." You were charged the regular price, Wright said. "Special orders to the kitchen in any restaurant are 'risky' at best," he added. We didn't get a free fruit plate for you, but we have saved you bus fare by sending you a full-color photo of the usual Town and Country fruit plate. Hope you enjoy viewing it.













Chicago Tribune, February 6, 1971
























THE ONE-MILLIONTH DINER
Mr. Smith keeps a careful tab on how many diners come into the two restaurants from day-to-day. So when the 10 millionth guest walked into the Town and Country on Ridge Avenue recently, it was a signal for celebration. Champagne was poured for all diners present, and the surprised 10 millionth one—Martin Lowery, professor of history at De Paul University—was presented with a gold credit card for meals gratis in Town and Country for a year, including lobster and steak dinners that night for Mr. and Mrs. Lowery, plus roses and an elaborately decorated cake for her. It was the first visit there for the Lowerys, who went on to recommendation of friends.

So that the Town and Country on North Avenue would not be out of it, identical awards were given there to the 10 millionth and 1 diner. He turned out to be a printer, John Shubeck of Arlington Heights, who had arrived with his wife to celebrate their 28th wedding anniversary.

Incidentally, Marie Adler, the waitress who served the Lowerys, was on hand to serve the first customers at the Town and Country on Ridge when Mr. Smith and his late brother, Tony, opened the restaurant 15 years ago.
                                                                                                 —Chicago Tribune, April 1, 1971

Ted Smith's Town and Country restaurant on Ridge has curtailed its hours and will be open all night only on Fridays and Saturdays, while the North Avenue spot remains open around the clock.
                                                                                          —Chicago Tribune, January14, 1976

RESTAURANT EXEC FACES TAX CHARGE
Clark Ridge Restaurant, Inc. and Ted Smith, its president, and treasurer, were charged Wednesday with failing to pay $11,000 in Illinois state sales taxes.

Smith, of 1036 Hubbard Drive, Wilmette, and his corporation operate the Town and Country restaurant, 5970 North Ridge Avenue.

The complaint, filed in Circuit Court, charges that the corporation failed to report $230,000 ($1,090,000 today) worth of sales from November 1974 through June 1975 to avoid paying sales tax.

If convicted, Smith and the corporation could be fined $8,000 ($4,000 each) in addition to paying the $11,000 owed, and Smith could serve up to six months in jail.
                                                                                 —Chicago Tribune, Thursday, July 1, 1976

THE DEATH OF TOWN AND COUNTRY RESTAURANTS
The shuttered Town and Country (April 1980) restaurant at 5970 N. Ridge Avenue is expected to reopen in about six weeks (in June 1980) as Chris Carson's third Carsons Ribs restaurant. 

Sometime between May and November 1987, the Town and Country Xpressway restaurant was closed, and their marquee read: "For Lease." A Restaurant and Bar Auction was held on Thursday, April 6, 1989, at 11 am to liquidate all furniture, fixtures, and kitchen hardware, run by the Business Auction Liquidators Co., from Chicago.

Today, the location is home to the Mercedes-Benz of Chicago dealership.

Compiled by Dr. Neil Gale. Ph.D.