A Simple Explaination Why The Chicago Tribune's "Injun Summer," Yearly Reprint Was Not Racist.


In historical writing and analysis, PRESENTISM is the introduction of present-day ideas and perspectives into depictions or interpretations of the past. I believe presentism is a form of cultural bias, and it creates a distorted understanding of the subject matter. Reading modern notions of morality into the past is committing the error of presentism. I'm well aware that historical accounts are written by people and can be slanted, so I try my hardest to present articles that are fact-based and well researched, without interjecting any of my personal opinions.

NOTE: I present articles without regard to race, color, political party, religion, national origin, citizenship status, gender, age, disability, or military status. What I present are facts — NOT ALTERNATIVE FACTS — about the subject.
 What you won't find are rumors, lies, unfounded claims, character assassinations, hateful statements, insults, or attempts at humor.
PLEASE PRACTICE HISTORICISM, WHICH IS THE
INTERPRETATION OF THE PAST IN ITS OWN CONTEXT.


I found that the vast majority of peoples' [via 10+ years of Facebook comments] first thought was nostalgic, their parents reading Injun Summer to them. Then looking at all the detail in the two illustrations, for hours. 

"Injun Summer," was an early era's celebration of autumn, as seen through childhood imagination. No thoughts of racism. 

Why? Because when "Injun Summer," was written in 1907, it was McCutcheon's personal thoughts back to his boyhood living on an Indiana farm in the 1870s. McCutcheon constructed his thoughts into the style of Mark Twain's plain-spoken southern charm. 

The story accompanies two illustrations McCutcheon drew.
The 'X' does not print on the posters or canvas prints.


By Dr. Neil Gale, Ph.D. 

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