Thursday, September 14, 2017

The Saloon Building, Chicago. (1836-1871)

The 'Saloon Building' at the southeast corner of Clark and Lake Streets in Chicago.
The "Saloon Building" was a three-story brick building erected in 1836 by Capt. J.B.F. Russell and George W. Doan at the Southeast corner of Clark and Lake streets. It was named after the French word salon, meaning ‘small reception hall’ or ‘meeting hall,’ not a ‘drinking establishment.’
The 'Saloon Building' at the southeast corner of Clark and Lake Streets in Chicago.
It was then the largest hall west of Buffalo, New York, devoted to public meetings and political ceremony. Chicago received its city charter under its roof in 1837 and it served as City Hall and Municipal Court until 1842. 

Note: During this time period, the word 'grocery' meant a drinking establishment; a tavern, pub or bar.


Compiled by Neil Gale, Ph.D.

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